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Beyond nuclear deterrence new aims, new arms by

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Published by Crane, Russak in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Europe

Subjects:

  • North Atlantic Treaty Organization,
  • Military policy,
  • World politics -- 1965-,
  • Europe -- Defenses

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementedited by Johan J. Holst, Uwe Nerlich.
ContributionsHolst, Johan Jørgen, 1937-, Nerlich, Uwe.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsUA646 .B44 1977
The Physical Object
Paginationxiv, 314 p. ;
Number of Pages314
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4888931M
ISBN 100844809748
LC Control Number76020283

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Beyond Nuclear Deterrence: New Aims, New Arms Hardcover – by Holst, Johan J., and Nerlich, Uwe, eds. (Author)Author: Holst, Johan J., and Nerlich, Uwe, eds. In Beyond Nuclear Deterrence, two of Russia's top nonproliferation and international security experts, Alexei Arbatov and Vladimir Dvorkin, critically assess the history of deterrence as it emerged between the Soviet Union and the U.S. and evolved through the Cold War to include an expanding nuclear lfcmalta.com by: 4. The authors argue that while deterrence as a concept has always been paradoxical, it is poorly equipped to handle today's most significant nuclear challenges: proliferation and terrorism. Nuclear arms control must move beyond the deadlock of lfcmalta.com: Alexei Arbatov. Note: Citations are based on reference standards. However, formatting rules can vary widely between applications and fields of interest or study. The specific requirements or preferences of your reviewing publisher, classroom teacher, institution or organization should be applied.

Oct 27,  · Dr. E. Martin Schotz is a member of the Northampton Working Group to Prevent Nuclear War and the Peace Taskforce of Franklin County Continuing The Revolution. His article original appeared on The Peaceworker. For more on the myth of deterrence, see the Beyond Nuclear . Nuclear arms control must move beyond the deadlock of deterrence. The U.S. and Russia need to take the first bilateral steps to remove mutual nuclear deterrence as the foundation of their strategic relationship and implement changes that can be exported internationally. Mar 26,  · The U.S. needs to start writing the guidelines for 21 st century strategic deterrence, focusing on methods beyond nuclear options. Estimated time to read: 11 minutes. By Aryan Dale and Brendon Herbeck. Introduction For half of the 20th Century, Warsaw Pact and NATO countries alike wrote the book for how deterrence theory should be applied. This second edition of the Nuclear Abolition Forum, which has the same title as the event – Moving Beyond Nuclear Deterrence to a Nuclear Weapons Free World – picks up where the dynamic discussions of the event had to leave off. Several of the speakers have contributed articles to this edition, allowing them to expound further.

Nevertheless, deterrence is the cornerstone of nuclear weapons policy, perpetuating their possession by nine nations. If we are serious about moving the nuclear ban agenda forward, we cannot shy away from the deterrence argument. In our new Deterrence pamphlet, we set out ten reasons why nuclear deterrence cannot possibly work. We conclude that. And in reality there are more realpolitik reasons for having nuclear weapons — to offset conventional imbalance, prevent regime change, retain a seat on the UN Security Council, and so forth. Nevertheless, deterrence is the cornerstone of defense policy and spending among all the major super powers. There are currently a number of debates worldwide on the appropriateness of adopting a 'first-strike' intent for the use of nuclear weapons; or, at least, not rejecting the possibility of a first-strike nuclear launch in extremis. The. This volume examines the possibility of a world without nuclear weapons. It starts from the observation that, although nuclear deterrence has long been dominant in debates about war and peace, recent events show that ridicule and stigmatization of nuclear weapons and their possessors is on the rise.